Contractual obligation with Green Card Employer.


sri231

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You can believe in church. You posted some completely irrelevant stuff based on 7-year old stuff from Google.

Please enter 2014.

 

 

I replied to some questions from Rahul   which were very relevant.   If you cannot understand the relevance not my problem  stalker .   I am very much into 2014 .... for example ,  I know what is WARN  :) 

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You can believe in church. You posted some completely irrelevant stuff based on 7-year old stuff from Google.

Please enter 2014.

 

 

I replied to some questions from Rahul   which were very relevant.   If you cannot understand the relevance not my problem  stalker .   I am very much into 2014 .... for example , unlike you,  I know what is WARN    or that FAFSA is possible for Parolee :)  Grow up kiddo

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  • 4 weeks later...

1. There is no contractual obligation, unless there is a contract.

 

2. Green card cases are based upon future job offers. Thus, since representations are made by the employer and prospective employee that there is a job and intention to work, it is important to carry through with those representations. While, generally, this issue is not monitored by the government, it arises if the person tries to naturalize.

 

3. If the employer is saying there is a job, then there should be a job. If a person is applying for a visa and saying they will work for the employer, they should do so. It is not necessary to work there forever, and it would be possible have, say, a part time job on the side.

 

4. Individuals can pay the legal fees and costs related to the I-140/I-485 (or CP process, in this case).  Until mid-2007, individuals could also pay for the labor certification legal fees/expenses. This changed as part of the same regulation that eliminated labor substitution.

 

5. The reason the rules are different for the first stage of the GC case, the PERM labor certification, and the second and third parts, the I-140 and I-485, is that different government departments are involved. The PERM case goes to the Department of Labor. They deal with protecting the labor market/wage issues etc. They have concerns about such payments, and, thus, there is a DOL regulation prohibiting payments for the PERM/related part of the case. But, they only control that part, so that is where it ends. The USCIS doesn't have that rule.  

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4. Individuals can pay the legal fees and costs related to the I-140/I-485 (or CP process, in this case).  Until mid-2007, individuals could also pay for the labor certification legal fees/expenses. This changed as part of the same regulation that eliminated labor substitution.

 

 

 

Thank you Attorney_6 for the clarifications...now some people can stop harassing me :)

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Thank you Attorney_6 for the clarifications...now some people can stop harassing me :)

 

 

If you go back and check my posts ,  I hinted you long back.   But it is NOT about your perceived violation of law .    It is about your INTENT (Niyat)   ,  telling multiple lies . 

 

Up until now you thought you violated law but still trying to preach others .   You have built different cover up stories at different times ..... that is all what we are pointing to

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Thank you Attorney_6 for the clarifications...now some people can stop harassing me :)

It's surprising that you didn't mentioned this since you got caught in this forum for paying for your GC. This clearly says that you paid for your GC when it was illegal to pay the GC processing fee. If not you would have already proved your innocence at that time itself, rather than lying each and every time.

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