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kpv

EB1A - High remuneration category - Help!

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Hi,

 

My frined is applying in EB1A and one of the category he is targetting is "High remuneration" as he draws around 60-70% in excess of the average salary for that position and location. He has all the evidences along with 'national average salary' comparisons from Salary.com and Glassdoor. However, his attorney says that he needs an "authoritative letter' from any HR rep from an IT firm  confirming this (after looking at the evidences). The attorney was not able to provide any references.

 

Has anyone applied under this category and if yes, what evidences need to be prvided?

Can any one provide a reference of any IT firm that can give such letter (at a reasoable cost)??

 

ANY help will be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

 

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Seems all parties involved got no clue what they are doing..

 

-High pay is just one of the three required, only to substantiate other two claims..while CIS does not define "high" salary, 60% above avg may not cut it..

-Attorney is asking other firm's HR to evaluate and certify this high salary? for pete's sake, there is the official PWD that defines the pay scale..

 

-a reasonable service fee request by a guy making extraordinary salary?..there goes the basis of the entire claim..

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"Drawing around 60-70% in excess of the average salary for that position and location" is hardly "high remuneration".  Maybe 2-3 times prevailing wage would be considered as potentially satisfying the criteria.  It sounds like your "friend" is being unrealistic regarding the EB-1A preference category.  It is very hard to meet the criteria.  If it was a simple as getting paid a high wage, then there would be backlogs in EB-1.  Also, does your "friend" not have access to a computer to post the questions for himself -- "my friend" invariably means yourself.

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Hi Mr. Cap-gap and Catx you do not know the answer please dont try to be heroes by saying something doesn't add any value.

 

For your information, I have seen people making this category applicable - espeacially when the salary range has been more than 50%. If you don't know the answer please refrain from commenting.

 

Why am I posting on my friend's behalf - is none of your botheration CATX..

 

 

 

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I would urge posters to keep their tempers in check and at home as it were. It is not acceptable that you misuse the anonymity of the forum to use intemperate words because you do not like the answer. This means you OP. Having said that have your friend talk to the firm of Murthy.

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You seem to be a very good friend..why don't you spend on your friends behalf and pay an attorney to get legal advice.

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To get the original issue back on track: Recently, for purposes not related to immigration, I had to get a salary survey. Depending on the field, there are usually several available. Again, depending on the field, price varies. The one I obtained had a price tag of $3000. Depending on the details and the depth of analysis, the price could have been as high as $5000 (or more!). For my purposes, I did not need an in-depth analysis.

 

Another option is that some salary surveys provide you a copy of the results (for free) if you participate in the survey. However the depth of analysis is limited and it may not be enough for immigration purposes.

 

Since you mentioned IT, did you look at IEEE salary survey? The salary and benefits report is about $200 for non-members (members receive a discount).  There is also a separate Computer Industry Salary Report. (To find out more, google "IEEE salary survey").

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