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stansilasmiles

Meaning of " the petitioner must still post the original LCA in the new work location"

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However, the petitioner must still post the original LCA in the new work location within the same area of intended employment. For example, an H-1B employee presently authorized to work at a location within the New York City metropolitan statistical area (NYC) may not trigger the need for a new LCA if merely transferred to a new worksite in NYC, but the petitioner would still need to post the previously obtained LCA at the new work location. See 20 CFR 655.734. This is required regardless of whether an entire office moved from one location to another within NYC, or just the one H-1B employee.

^ this is here : https://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Laws/Memoranda/2015/2015-0721_Simeio_Solutions_Transition_Guidance_Memo_Format_7_21_15.pdf 

 

 

Can somebody explain the meaning  of

1.  " the petitioner must still post the original LCA in the new work location"  should the lca be plastered to the wall or something? 

2. For example, an H-1B employee presently authorized to work at a location within the New York City metropolitan statistical area (NYC) may not trigger the need for a new LCA if merely transferred to a new worksite in NYC, but the petitioner would still need to post the previously obtained LCA at the new work location.

I have not been able to make sense of these two statements.

Background:

I work remotely from my rented apartment in Dallas Texas. Now if I were to move to a new apartment within dallas texas,

am i right in saying that an lca amendment is not required? 

 

 

 

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22 hours ago, stansilasmiles said:

However, the petitioner must still post the original LCA in the new work location within the same area of intended employment. For example, an H-1B employee presently authorized to work at a location within the New York City metropolitan statistical area (NYC) may not trigger the need for a new LCA if merely transferred to a new worksite in NYC, but the petitioner would still need to post the previously obtained LCA at the new work location. See 20 CFR 655.734. This is required regardless of whether an entire office moved from one location to another within NYC, or just the one H-1B employee.

^ this is here : https://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Laws/Memoranda/2015/2015-0721_Simeio_Solutions_Transition_Guidance_Memo_Format_7_21_15.pdf 

 

 

Can somebody explain the meaning  of

1.  " the petitioner must still post the original LCA in the new work location"  should the lca be plastered to the wall or something? 

Yes. Usually at client site at notice board or a place where they won't tear it down and one takes a photo. 

2. For example, an H-1B employee presently authorized to work at a location within the New York City metropolitan statistical area (NYC) may not trigger the need for a new LCA if merely transferred to a new worksite in NYC, but the petitioner would still need to post the previously obtained LCA at the new work location.

I have not been able to make sense of these two statements.

It's very straight forward what's there not to understand? It says, if you move within the same MSA don't file new LCA just post the old one at the new location and you should be good to go! This only applies if all other factors have not changed i.e. salary, role, title etc. If any thing else changes you have to file new LCA & Amendment. 

Background:

I work remotely from my rented apartment in Dallas Texas. Now if I were to move to a new apartment within dallas texas,

am i right in saying that an lca amendment is not required? 

Yes. You bring up an interesting thought though, it would be funny to post the new LCA outside your apartment, lol. Interesting in case of a USCIS site visit. 

 

 

 

 

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